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19 May 2010 @ 05:40 pm
Apocrypha  
Years ago in college, I heard a recounting of a movie short called "De Düve" (The Dove). It was a Bergman spoof, with fake Swedish unnecessarily translated into subtitles. I've retold it to the kids (3rd-hand now), and finally found it on the Interwebs today. Old crack is still good crack—give it a shot: De Düve. \o/

I'm tempted to watch more of it at work, but I'm still recovering from last week's jaunt through foreign hardware-coding in preparation for a colleague's code-review. Boy, the difficulty of concentrating on that stuff made me question whether I might have a touch of ADHD. My mother claims to have it, and god knows I will pick almost any option that does not involve standing/sitting around and waiting for something. Why take the shuttlebus, when you can walk there faster? Never go to the dentist's or doctor's office without a book! And TV commercials mean it's time to jump up off the sofa and do something else! Oy. Where does impatience end and ADHD begin? :0

I finished both of the books I mentioned being near the end of yesterday. The Overlook was good, but trailed off suddenly. How To Paint A Dead Man was fascinating, but seemed to stop about one narrative short for each of the rotating POVs. That last book nearly lost me in the opening chapter, which was in second person. But that turned out to be a technique specific to the character, who was the female half of a set of fraternal twins and had been sent to therapy in childhood to learn to separate her identify ("I" and "me") from her brother's ("You"). The second narrative was in first-person, and the remaining two in third-person. I suspect the first-person was used to transition more smoothly out of the second-person, rather than having three POVs in third-person and one lone first-person POV. All of this is beside the story itself, which was rich and sensual, and which offered characters that were sometimes frustrating if always interesting. I'm tempted to read more of the author's works, now.