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09 December 2009 @ 04:51 pm
 
I finished the 10-character/15-word fic meme and posted that up, though everything was way over 15 words.

But hardly anyone's reading it, and I'm really hoping someone who watches "Fringe" will give the story featuring Walter a try. Writing him was a hoot, and a totally new character for me. Oh, Walter-- you'll never stop both fascinating and horrifying me!

We're watching S1 of Mad Men on DVD, and I'm not sure whether I like it or not. It's entertaining, but I pretty much hate all the characters in it, and that usually winds up being a problem down the road. :0

Not so for The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, which is finally on DVD. Yay! Disc 2 is on its way...

We watched the "Fall Finale" of White Collar, whatever that means (I hope it means "back in January" and not "back in March"). Matthew Bomer is so pretty that I could stare at him forever (light eyes, black lashes/eyebrows is always a winner for me), and I find Tim DeKay both competent and adorable as Agent Burke. Really, I've only ever seen DeKay in "Big Eden" before this, where he was hunky and did a fine job. Too bad his man-kissing opportunity was Ari Gross instead of Mr. Bomer, much as I love the movie (if Agent Burke wasn't happily married, I'd be slashing the hell out of those two). Also, I secretly love the revelation of where exactly Mozzie seems to live. It totally makes sense to me!

The online Xmas shopping continues. How did Lite Brite get to be a $27 toy? And why are people selling Shrinky Dink packages, but not the oven?

My other peeve is childrens' books that go out of print. Wizard and Wart and Wizard And Wart Go To Sea (Janice Smith) are unavailable, and I had to go to a second source for Dragon Gets By (Dav Pilkey). Those are marvelous, funny Level-2 reader books. One year, Harriet The Spy was even out of print!

I did, however, find the Yogi Tea "Chai Redbush" I'd wanted to give as a gift. Only took 4 stores for that one. ;) I've got a Trader Joe's trip in the future too, for gift-basket noms...

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cindy: fangirltsuki_no_bara on December 10th, 2009 01:48 am (UTC)
white collar is back in january. and i could watch matt bomer do nothing for an hour. seriously, i would hit that like the fist of an angry god. pity he's got a boyfriend.

"you live in a storage unit."
"but i really live in a storage unit."

mozzie is also kind of adorable, altho not in the same way as matt and tim....

don't you shrink shrinky dinks in your own oven?
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphorshalfshellvenus on December 10th, 2009 02:06 am (UTC)
and i could watch matt bomer do nothing for an hour. seriously, i would hit that like the fist of an angry god. pity he's got a boyfriend.
I can only lust, since I'm married too, but wow. I didn't like him as much as Bryce (because all we see in S1 of Chuck is mostly "Bryce the Betrayer", and I have issues with that). As Neal, though... god, the prettiness never ends. His face.

mozzie is also kind of adorable, altho not in the same way as matt and tim....
He is! I've seen the actor in other things (Sex in The City, Pushing Daisies), but this is the first time he's been adorable. Plus, he knows stuff and knows how to find stuff out!

don't you shrink shrinky dinks in your own oven?
Hmmmm. We got a kit with its own oven (one of those light-bulb-based dealies, like an Easy Bake Oven). So maybe that's changed and people just bake them directly.

If that's true, I could buy some accessory packs and be done! Whoo! Because it is hard to shop for this little boy, other than books (which I gave him for his birthday, tomorrow). He has PTSD and other issues which mean that any kind of loud, excitable, overstimulating toys are off-limits. And after you're about 2-5, that covers most of the fun toys that boys like to play with!
realpestilencerealpestilence on December 10th, 2009 02:05 am (UTC)
I've read the first 3-4 Ladies' Detective Agency books. I like them a lot, very gentle-spirited books that may not be great *mysteries*, as such; but are good character studies and have a strong sense of place. Good books for people who don't like violent mysteries. I hope the show is as good (or better than) the books! :D
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Bookshalfshellvenus on December 10th, 2009 02:07 am (UTC)
I haven't read the books, but the show is marvelous. The mysteries are not terribly epic, but the characters are delightful.

I read an interview with the author which said that he was surprised at the reception his books were getting in the States, where people love them, as opposed to France where they've been out awhile and people scorn them. :0
realpestilence: fanWOMANrealpestilence on December 10th, 2009 05:32 am (UTC)
The French are, as a culture, snobs. I mean, I love that they value their *own* culture so much, and think highly of anyone artistic; but it does have its downsides (such as providing an expatriate haven for the ahh...lesser-talented artistes among us, or the fading stars who's day has passed but who won't get off the stage). However, they're not exactly a people who'd appreciate these gentle books for their good qualities.

These aren't omg-epic literature. But the language is lovely-the author really knows the native speech patterns, and portrays local life and community pride well. They're also non-aggressively feminist, in that at least 2 of the main characters are bright, capable women. There's a simple faith and grace in the books, too, all about...doing right, treating people well, all of us being brothers and sisters, etc, woven in among the people being people/mystery stuff. Not the kind of material that a culture of sophisticates would appreciate, imo.

The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Bookshalfshellvenus on December 10th, 2009 05:40 am (UTC)
They're also non-aggressively feminist, in that at least 2 of the main characters are bright, capable women. There's a simple faith and grace in the books, too, all about...doing right, treating people well, all of us being brothers and sisters, etc, woven in among the people being people/mystery stuff. Not the kind of material that a culture of sophisticates would appreciate, imo.
Yes-- the simplicity of remembering the good and right things, the gentle characters, and the ability to escape into that vivid and different culture have such appeal to American readers (and probably those of other cultures too).

If you expect high art from such a medium, you're mistaking the basic genre (you might find that art occasionally, but it's rare) and overlooking the pleasure of the unusuaul and appealing thing that these stories already are.
frostian: christmas/joyfrostian on December 10th, 2009 03:43 am (UTC)
I love your Walter. *laughs* That's just so ... Walter. And John's reaction is pretty much dead-on. :D
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Random Fandomhalfshellvenus on December 10th, 2009 03:47 am (UTC)
Hee! I think John's reaction is the same as most people's, i.e., run away!

House, on the other hand, would find Walter fascinating. The weirder, the better. Because at least Walter is never boring. ;)

Thanks for reading!
Maramara_snh on December 10th, 2009 04:49 pm (UTC)
About Mad Men? Yeah, I don't like any of the people. That's the main problem with the show, as far as I'm concerned. I could get past all the horrible memories of those days that it dredges up for me if I could get cozy with at least one of them, but I can't.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: TVhalfshellvenus on December 11th, 2009 02:08 am (UTC)
That's the main problem with the show, as far as I'm concerned. I could get past all the horrible memories of those days that it dredges up for me if I could get cozy with at least one of them, but I can't.
It's funny, someone on a comm was complaining about that "60s setting," and I was convinced that the show was set in the 50s. It's actually 1963, I think, but... I recognize that culture, those clothes, those attitudes, and that's the 50s in spades.

I hate the 50s and its mentality with a passion to begin with, but when you consider the characters... charming cad for a main character, an office full of ad-men who are all jerks, the secretaries are either the earnest Troll, the cheating Queen Bee or ditzy, and all of the many women the main character sleeps with know and don't care that he's married.

I wish I could like his wife, but I can't quite get there, and her friends are horrible.

It's a very stylish and snappy show, but it's filled with unpleasant people, and usually that means I'll eventually give up on it. Too bad, because so many people have raved about it!
Maramara_snh on December 11th, 2009 09:19 pm (UTC)
Like I said, if they'd lived that life for real, it would seem far less stylish and snappy.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphorshalfshellvenus on December 11th, 2009 09:37 pm (UTC)
I like to hope that it provides a little insight for women who say things like, "I'm not a feminist, but..." or "Well, I don't think things were ever really as bad as some people like to pretend."

Oh, but they were. It sucked to be a woman during that era (and many others before and after it), and it's nice to have an example of that week after week to remind people. Your options were limited back then, and if you had one of the three acceptable "pink collar" jobs (teacher, nurse, secretary) you were still treated like an idiot and expected to put up with being pawed at and hit on regularly. Bleh.
Maramara_snh on December 12th, 2009 02:25 am (UTC)
It breaks my heart (or makes me retch) to hear young women today dissing the Women's Movement that created the environment in which they may now pick and choose among life options unavailable to us when we were their age. When I first started looking for work, the classified ads were divided into "Help Wanted - Male" and "Help Wanted - Female." I broke a lot of barriers, myself, but not without paying a horrible price. I can't bear to think about it now. If I drop out of this discussion, it isn't because I don't appreciate what you're saying, but that I appreciate it too much.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphorshalfshellvenus on December 12th, 2009 03:35 am (UTC)
It breaks my heart (or makes me retch) to hear young women today dissing the Women's Movement that created the environment in which they may now pick and choose among life options unavailable to us when we were their age.
Oh, you're not kidding!

I went to check your userinfo, because I'd assumed you were much younger-- younger than me certainly, because almost everyone is! But no-- you've actually lived through more of that than I did, though my mother never let me forget what it used to be like (and yet my younger sister is one of those "I'm not a feminist but..." types).

My mother was of the second generation of female doctors in the U.S. She went to medical school during WWII, and was constantly reminded that she wouldn't have been there except that the MEN were off fighting (regardless of her outstanding grades). She had a professor who tried to flunk her to keep her out of medical school, she had another that would mark her correct answers as "wrong" on tests so that she wouldn't get the top grade in the class, and she had a guy in the '70s who said he would fail her psychiatric boards (she shifted specialties) unless she slept with him.

I was much luckier, but still-- the people who tried to steer me away from science and math (though I was really good at them), the college professor who hit on female students constantly and which was dealt with by telling the girls not to be alone with him, the creep at my first real job who rubbed against women and made lewd comments (which the all-male management decided "wasn't THAT bad"). Gah.

Well, don't want to drag you down into bad memories, but I'm glad you understand!
alienmom: SPN dean ok winkalienmom on December 12th, 2009 02:29 am (UTC)
Tim DeKay played Jonesy in Carnivale for 2 seasons. weird little show with some great quirky characters.

white collar....fabulous for all the reasons listed! and mossie too! LOL

overstimulating toys are off-limits

may i suggest Legos? keeps kids quite & entertained for years! a gift from the gods for parents everywhere! =] i started buying them when my oldest was 2 yrs. and didn't stop until my youngest son was in high school!

The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: heh-hehhalfshellvenus on December 12th, 2009 03:41 am (UTC)
Tim DeKay played Jonesy in Carnivale for 2 seasons. weird little show with some great quirky characters.
HOW COULD I HAVE FORGOTTEN THAT?!!? I've watched Carnivale too, though I didn't finish (the mysticism overwhelmed the part that was fun, i.e. another show ruined by a sprawling mytharc!) He didn't get to be hunky in Carnivale, but his was an interesting character.

Should I admit that I was up until 1:30 last night ODing on Peter/Neal slash, what little there is of it? Yum. Gads, I'm predictable.

may i suggest Legos? keeps kids quite & entertained for years!
I love LEGOs, but we were told he had enough of those (and Thomas, which is another great choice but he's on the upper end of the age for that). :(

Back in MY day (*pulls up rocking chair*) we only had the basic blocks in white/gray/red/blue/black, and we counted ourselves lucky if someone had wheels in their set!

Then, about 15 years ago, Pirate Island LEGOs showed up. Whoo-hoo! The dawn of a new era! Not to mention windows, steering wheels, doors, Star Wars characters, knights, horses, Indians, plants, trolls, dwarves... *koff* My son is getting the Dwarf Mining Colony and some other LEGOs this Christmas.

My nephew is getting Shrinky Dinks, because I could not find a regular-sized Lite Brite that wasn't ridiculously expense.