The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors (halfshellvenus) wrote,
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors
halfshellvenus

How I Survived The Weekend

Four days off are coming to a close, in which the kids were home the entire time and the grownups didn't even get out for a weekend date. I got in a bike ride Saturday (and argh— so did everyone else!) and again on Monday. The family went to the zoo Monday (crowded) because it was supposed to rain today (and did). Finally, this afternoon we sat the kids down with a movie so we could enjoy a little bedroom exercise of our own. And an hour later, my heart was still jacked up, so I biked in the garage instead of running the way I'd planned. Hoo, baby.

During said biking, I finished The Sum Of Us. This features a young Russell Crowe as a gay man living with his father (I'd seen one of the pix at green_queen's fabulous boykissing picspam). Because I hadn't read the summary, I was a little alarmed when the father suddenly spoke right to the camera. Ack! Cinemized stage play? Why, yes. But I survived. I did like the father very much, although good lord— he must scare off all of his son's dates with the sitting down and introducing himself and chatting away in the middle of everything. Repeatedly. It's like Debbie from QAF, except with less sense about boundaries! I'll bet you thought that wasn't possible. ;)

We saw Elizabeth: The Golden Age on DVD, featuring the incredible Cate Blanchett and Clive Owens and some other people. I've asked myself again and again whether Clive Owens is actually all that good-looking or whether it's that he has unstoppable charisma. I don't think I'd find him that attractive if he never spoke, but once he starts... *is a total goner* Rhys Ifans was also in this, and I have a weakness for the Welsh men. Even the American-born ones of Welsh blood like Jeffrey Dean Morgan, apparently.

Watched The Wizard Of Oz with the kids (their first viewing). Perhaps they were old enough (8 and 10), because the evil flying monkeys did NOT utterly freak them out. The older I get, the more I think Miss Gulch has a point and that Toto is an utterly nasty dog— which wouldn't matter if Dorothy weren't such a ninny and would actually control him. I am no longer mortified by the Cowardly Lion the way I was as a child (I was embarrassed for him because he was so ridiculous). Dorothy wears less well as time goes on (which is to say, I want to smack her), but this time around I loved every aspect of the character of the Wizard/Professor Marvel/gatekeeper/etc. What fabulous line delivery! Though I'll always miss the Scarecrow most of all... Lauren's random comment was, "I wonder where the red brick road goes." *is proud* I suspect it's visited in some of the other Baum books, which are insane and entertaining both (we used to have "Handy Mandy In Oz").

The next night was How To Eat Fried Worms. This was the kids' idea, and it was good actually— but gross! (as you might have guessed). My husband was bothered that the credits would not list "XYZ Osment" as the main character's credit (he was convinced it was Haley Joel Osment's younger brother)...

The grownups watched Superbad. That is, I finished it (cringing the whole time) but my husband bailed. I am SO glad I'm not of high-school (or even college age) these days. I'm far too much of a prude to survive the 'dating' climate. My hairdresser thought it was pretty funny (not his type of movie at all), but it was not for me. And guys who are obsessed with their dicks and think that the whole world should worship at their Altar of Cock (while giving nothing back)— gah. Let them date other men who share that obsession.

Speaking of obsessions... does the keyboard's "Insert" key have any real value other than pissing people off who are aiming for "home" or "delete" and suddenly find themselves overwriting existing text?


Tags: movies
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