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20 March 2007 @ 08:43 am
Supernatural Gen Drabbles: Ways To Get It Wrong  
Title: Ways To Get It Wrong
Author: HalfshellVenus
Characters: Dean, John (Gen)
Rating: PG
Summary: Sometimes the answers are not so obvious.
Author's Notes: For the "Tests" challenge on supernatural100.

x-x-x-x-x

Different Rules
For Dean, there was no Kindergarten.

Too much moving around and looking for answers-- no time for school just then. John taught the basics after work. Dean practiced the capital letters and numbers from the telephone display.

First grade started in Baton Rouge, and Dean was ready. "Curious George" was easy to read by then, and Dean had checked the supplies long enough quantify and add.

"Story concepts" was what threw him, after everything had gone so well.

"Are ghosts and witches real or pretend?"

Dean spoke up: "Real!"

How could he know that nobody else had ever seen them?


Conflicts
"This is a family, not a democracy."

John swore he'd never say that-- kids were entitled to their questions. Just not every decision every single time. Where had that come from? Sammy'd been such a happy boy, and now he never knew when to quit.

"Because I've got a new lead, that's why we're going."

Same discussion every time, same result with Sam storming out of the house or off to his room.

"You leave, you don't come back." And Sam hadn't.

Was walking out failing the test, or did Sam living on his own now mean he'd passed it?



-------- fin --------




 
 
 
cindy: the dean show - spn love overwhelmstsuki_no_bara on March 20th, 2007 04:09 pm (UTC)
the first one is really cute. i can picture an earnest wee!dean insisting that ghosts are real because he honestly doesn't know that most people have never seen them, because he hasn't quite figured out that most people don't live like he does. and the second one is kind of sad, but i really like the last line - does sam fail at family or succeed in self-reliance? i think both would be important to john.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Johnhalfshellvenus on March 20th, 2007 05:55 pm (UTC)
because he hasn't quite figured out that most people don't live like he does.
And this is so typical for little people. I think finding out that different kids have different bedtimes is a revelation to them. :0

i really like the last line - does sam fail at family or succeed in self-reliance? i think both would be important to john.
I do too, which is why he asks himself that. Sam left the family, in John's eyes, but he became self-sufficient and did so at a young age-- which is a basic mark of success for any adult (and parent).

It's not easy being a Winchester! :)
Entendre? Make mine a double.: SN Johndeirdre_c on March 20th, 2007 04:58 pm (UTC)
Oh John!! Parenting alone must be the hardest thing on earth. Does Sam walking out mean John passes or fails the parenting test?

Both are lovely, hon. ♥
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Johnhalfshellvenus on March 20th, 2007 06:08 pm (UTC)
Does Sam walking out mean John passes or fails the parenting test?
That's the interesting question. Did John drive Sam away (a little bit, yes) or did he raise a son who was able to strike out on his own and take care of himself (a basic requirement for successful parenting)?

It's a little bit of both, and I wonder if John ever grudgingly admitted that?
tabaqui: s&doutside2byliteratitabaqui on March 20th, 2007 05:16 pm (UTC)
You know, i'll bet John did a good amount of home schooling when they were little, until he realized they were moving beyond his basics in math and such...

And i love that last line on drabble two. Good stuff!
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Johnhalfshellvenus on March 20th, 2007 06:10 pm (UTC)
You know, i'll bet John did a good amount of home schooling when they were little, until he realized they were moving beyond his basics in math and such...
I would sure think so-- moving around all the time, and the early grades are easy enough to teach from an academic standpoint 1-on-1, if you don't care about socialization issues (I can hear John laughing long and hard at the foolishness of that idea). It would certainly simplify things for a single-parent trying to split his focus between real-world survival and revenge.

And i love that last line on drabble two. Good stuff!
Thank you, Tabaqui! It's the whole focus of that drabble, for obvious reasons. :)
tabaqui: backinblackbyno_other_choicetabaqui on March 20th, 2007 06:48 pm (UTC)
Yeah. I did a little home schooling and it's not hard, just takes time and patience. So i can see John quitting doing that about the time that Sam's old enough for first grade.
bluesister on March 20th, 2007 07:35 pm (UTC)
great title for the twosome--isn't it funny that there are, what, 20 episodes yet you don't tire of creating these? I love that.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Sam & Dean Genhalfshellvenus on March 21st, 2007 12:24 am (UTC)
:D I really love the "context" of this show-- the whole Demonhunting As Normal backdrop of the Winchesters, not to mention their angst and all their issues.

It gives such rich opportunities for reviewing "normal" in and out of the Winchester context. These are both "pre-series," and a person could almost spend a lifetime writing all the "before" stuff that took up the lives of the characters. :)
(Deleted comment)
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Sam & Dean Genhalfshellvenus on March 21st, 2007 12:25 am (UTC)
Thank you, Rinne! I didn't get a Sam one out of this set, but I definitely tried before mental fatigue ate my creative muse. :)
(Deleted comment)
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Sam & Dean Genhalfshellvenus on March 21st, 2007 12:31 am (UTC)
having lovely visions of baby!Sam propped up in John's lap as he teaches Dean to read:: Very nice work.
And definitely one of the nice moments of parent/child/education interaction. Rewarding for everyone when it all finally "clicks."

Poor Sam and John. Loggerheads!
The non-compliant child is always the challenge *cough-Christopher-cough*, partly because they're the one that calls you on all your B.S. (sometimes deservedly so) plus a whole bunch of stuff that honestly doesn't matter. Much of Sam's behavior I think was a reflection of all the ways in which John was unreasonable and didn't see it that way...
One Girl Revolution1grl_revolution on March 21st, 2007 01:36 am (UTC)
Both of these are great! I especially love the first one because it's so true! Of course Dean would answer true! lol. Great work.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Sam & Dean Genhalfshellvenus on March 21st, 2007 07:36 pm (UTC)
:D Thank you!

Oh, little kids... getting my son not to broadcast his every random thought at age 6 was hard enough, let alone something like "our reality is not the same as other people's." :0
iamstealthyoneiamstealthyone on March 21st, 2007 05:15 pm (UTC)
Love these!

"Are ghosts and witches real or pretend?"

Dean spoke up: "Real!"

How could he know that nobody else had ever seen them?


This brings up a good point, which is at what age did both boys figure out they really couldn’t talk about the supernatural stuff in front of other people, that the supernatural stuff (and them, by extension) was not normal?

Was walking out failing the test, or did Sam living on his own now mean he'd passed it?

Ooh, that’s good. So, so good. That’s probably one of the hardest things about parenting is when the kids go out on their own. On the one hand, that’s the whole point: You raise your kids to be self-sufficient, to think for themselves, to be their own person. But when they leave, it’s bittersweet, and even more so for John, given the way Sam leaves.

Oh, Winchesters.
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors: Sam & Dean Genhalfshellvenus on March 21st, 2007 07:40 pm (UTC)
This brings up a good point, which is at what age did both boys figure out they really couldn’t talk about the supernatural stuff in front of other people, that the supernatural stuff (and them, by extension) was not normal?
I've often wondered that myself. And then there's what you teach them, and what they actually adhere to in public. :0

That’s probably one of the hardest things about parenting is when the kids go out on their own. On the one hand, that’s the whole point: You raise your kids to be self-sufficient, to think for themselves, to be their own person. But when they leave, it’s bittersweet
This is really a universal situation for any parent, as you say-- and harder for a man who honestly never expected his children to leave at all-- yet helped precipitate it.
iamstealthyoneiamstealthyone on March 21st, 2007 07:49 pm (UTC)
And then there's what you teach them, and what they actually adhere to in public. :0

Word!