The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors (halfshellvenus) wrote,
The Coalition For Disturbing Metaphors
halfshellvenus

Yesterday was a blur...

Lost the morning on my cantankerous computer's refusal to cooperate with three different monitors. Lost the internet for 1/2 the day because Internet Explorer was in some sort of mood (not the network, just that one single application).

So, my spn_vday porn fic was late, late, late as a result. But it is now done! In and around 1)3-dozen cupcakes for my daughter's class (for her half-birthday), 2) the remainder of "Tristan and Isolde" (due at the video store today), and 3) The most recent episode of "Lost." Heck, I was up so late that I was writing through parts of Letterman and South Park!


Tristan and Isolde was a far better movie than I expected. I don't know why I thought it would be melodrama and MTV-softcore-prettiness, but I was very glad to be proven wrong.

Unless I'm forgetting how the classic story goes (Hi, jules1013 and fourfreedoms and deirdre_c), young Tristan is sent over to Ireland to fetch a bride back for his uncle Marke. He falls for her on the boat, though both of them should know better, and they begin this torrid affair that manifests in a series of secret meetings in a cottage in the woods. The melodrama is created because the infatuation happens so quickly, and because the two would-be lovers could easily stop the whole thing before it ever really starts (and should have).

This modified version of the story has Tristan and Isolde meeting in Ireland, where she heals him back from the brink of death and they fall in love. When Tristan returns later, to fight in a contest where the spoils will be the Irish king's daughter, he wins Isolde for Marke before ever knowing that she was not the castle-servant she'd told him she was. The story becomes drama and not melodrama with that shift, made all the stronger by the fact that Marke is a good and noble man, and that Tristan loves him so strongly that he has no easy choice to make.

Lots of battle and action scenes, really compelling scenery, and oh, the music. There are two main themes used, both rather simple piano motifs. But the one in particular-- first revealed as Isolde begins to fall in love with Tristan on that Irish beach and then later used to evoke the tragedy of their union-- it is so full of ache. It sounds like longing, like doomed love, like desperately seeking something that will destroy you in the end. *Sighs*

Music is still my first love, and at times like this it is so very clear why...

I recommend the movie, in case you hadn't guessed. And I'd link you to those two tunes, if only I could.

I know some of you have seen this one (Rachel?). And I looked up the credits on imdb.com, and felt secret glee at having correctly identified the Irish king's accent as Scottish. Why do casting people think no-one will notice that?




Tags: movies
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